Monday, June 15, 2015

DIY | Single Slit + Pin Hole

I captured the Wave Nature of light!!!

Here are my first "ok to good" results of my DIY Single Slit Diffraction Experiment & Pin Hole Diffraction Experiment. Still noisy and polluted by my non-scientific equipments, but still really impressive and better that the other DIY on the web.

These experiments are well known and were created in the past to illustrate the fact that Photons have a Wave Nature easily noticeable when you reach a certain point for the Uncertainty Principle. What you're seeing here are basically photons (green laser) that are passing through a tight slit or tight hole, projected on a white cardboard. The shots below represent ~2 feets wide, this board was at ~8 feets from the slit/hole. In resume, the Uncertainty Principle is that there's a limitation for a system (quantum scale) to know precise position and precise momentum at the same time. When one is "increasing" in precision to know it, the other one falls in the "uncertainty". The principle is based on the Planck Lenght, the smallest values of all Lenght/Energy, nothing can be/go below it.

Further down more links [VIDEOS]!

I'll create a DIY video and possibly an Instructables step-by-step of these two fabulous DIY experiments. STAY TUNED !




VERITASIUM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8FTr2qMutA

Old MIT (single slit) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgW7qaOZD0U

Old MIT (pin hole) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmg1XyOSAk0


I'll try for sure the Double Slit Interference Experiment. But I'll be sure that I can use 2 slits with a length that is not "alone" creating a diffraction pattern. What I notice throughout the web is that you can find a lot of banky DIY of the Double Slit Experiment: the problem in their tests is that they used 2 slit too narrow already, taking only one of their slit and you'll get diffraction anyway. To reproduce a more pure result, I think, we have to create the Double Slit Experiment with 2 slits that each one, alone, doesn't create interferences.


No comments:

Post a Comment